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Recent Discoveries


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The Vasculature in Prediabetes.

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The Vasculature in Prediabetes.

Circ Res. 2018 Apr 13;122(8):1135-1150

Authors: Wasserman DH, Wang TJ, Brown NJ

Abstract
The frequency of prediabetes is increasing as the prevalence of obesity rises worldwide. In prediabetes, hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and inflammation and metabolic derangements associated with concomitant obesity cause endothelial vasodilator and fibrinolytic dysfunction, leading to increased risk of cardiovascular and renal disease. Importantly, the microvasculature affects insulin sensitivity by affecting the delivery of insulin and glucose to skeletal muscle; thus, endothelial dysfunction and extracellular matrix remodeling promote the progression from prediabetes to diabetes mellitus. Weight loss is the mainstay of treatment in prediabetes, but therapies that improved endothelial function and vasodilation may not only prevent cardiovascular disease but also slow progression to diabetes mellitus.

PMID: 29650631 [PubMed - in process]

Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Associations With Cardiovascular Disease in Adults.

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Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Associations With Cardiovascular Disease in Adults.

J Am Coll Cardiol. 2018 Apr 10;71(14):1574-1583

Authors: Ivey KS, Edwards KM, Talbot HK

Abstract
Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is historically known for causing respiratory illness in young children, but the appreciation of its impact on older adults is growing. Studies have shown that hospitalization for respiratory illness due to RSV is complicated by cardiovascular events in 14% to 22% of adult patients, including worsening congestive heart failure, acute coronary syndrome, and arrhythmias. Additionally, underlying cardiovascular disease is associated with hospitalization in 45% to 63% of adults with confirmed RSV. In summary, patients with cardiopulmonary disease have higher rates of health care utilization for RSV-related illness and worse outcomes. Patients with cardiovascular disease likely represent an important target population for the rapidly developing field of RSV vaccines.

PMID: 29622165 [PubMed - in process]

Cell-of-Origin Patterns Dominate the Molecular Classification of 10,000 Tumors from 33 Types of Cancer.

Cell-of-Origin Patterns Dominate the Molecular Classification of 10,000 Tumors from 33 Types of Cancer.

Cell. 2018 Apr 05;173(2):291-304.e6

Authors: Hoadley KA, Yau C, Hinoue T, Wolf DM, Lazar AJ, Drill E, Shen R, Taylor AM, Cherniack AD, Thorsson V, Akbani R, Bowlby R, Wong CK, Wiznerowicz M, Sanchez-Vega F, Robertson AG, Schneider BG, Lawrence MS, Noushmehr H, Malta TM, Cancer Genome Atlas Network, Stuart JM, Benz CC, Laird PW

Abstract
We conducted comprehensive integrative molecular analyses of the complete set of tumors in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), consisting of approximately 10,000 specimens and representing 33 types of cancer. We performed molecular clustering using data on chromosome-arm-level aneuploidy, DNA hypermethylation, mRNA, and miRNA expression levels and reverse-phase protein arrays, of which all, except for aneuploidy, revealed clustering primarily organized by histology, tissue type, or anatomic origin. The influence of cell type was evident in DNA-methylation-based clustering, even after excluding sites with known preexisting tissue-type-specific methylation. Integrative clustering further emphasized the dominant role of cell-of-origin patterns. Molecular similarities among histologically or anatomically related cancer types provide a basis for focused pan-cancer analyses, such as pan-gastrointestinal, pan-gynecological, pan-kidney, and pan-squamous cancers, and those related by stemness features, which in turn may inform strategies for future therapeutic development.

PMID: 29625048 [PubMed - in process]

Breast Cancer Family History and Contralateral Breast Cancer Risk in Young Women: An Update From the Women's Environmental Cancer and Radiation Epidemiology Study.

Breast Cancer Family History and Contralateral Breast Cancer Risk in Young Women: An Update From the Women's Environmental Cancer and Radiation Epidemiology Study.

J Clin Oncol. 2018 Apr 05;:JCO2017773424

Authors: Reiner AS, Sisti J, John EM, Lynch CF, Brooks JD, Mellemkjær L, Boice JD, Knight JA, Concannon P, Capanu M, Tischkowitz M, Robson M, Liang X, Woods M, Conti DV, Duggan D, Shore R, Stram DO, Thomas DC, Malone KE, Bernstein L, WECARE Study Collaborative Group, Bernstein JL

Abstract
Purpose The Women's Environmental Cancer and Radiation Epidemiology (WECARE) study demonstrated the importance of breast cancer family history on contralateral breast cancer (CBC) risk, even for noncarriers of deleterious BRCA1/2 mutations. With the completion of WECARE II, updated risk estimates are reported. Additional analyses that exclude women negative for deleterious mutations in ATM, CHEK2*1100delC, and PALB2 were performed. Patients and Methods The WECARE Study is a population-based case-control study that compared 1,521 CBC cases with 2,212 individually matched unilateral breast cancer (UBC) controls. Participants were younger than age 55 years when diagnosed with a first invasive breast cancer between 1985 and 2008. Women were interviewed about breast cancer risk factors, including family history. A subset of women was screened for deleterious mutations in BRCA1/2, ATM, CHEK2*1100delC, and PALB2. Rate ratios (RRs) were estimated using multivariable conditional logistic regression. Cumulative absolute risks (ARs) were estimated by combining RRs from the WECARE Study and population-based SEER*Stat cancer incidence data. Results Women with any first-degree relative with breast cancer had a 10-year AR of 8.1% for CBC (95% CI, 6.7% to 9.8%). Risks also were increased if the relative was diagnosed at an age younger than 40 years (10-year AR, 13.5%; 95% CI, 8.8% to 20.8%) or with CBC (10-year AR, 14.1%; 95% CI, 9.5% to 20.7%). These risks are comparable with those seen in BRCA1/2 deleterious mutation carriers (10-year AR, 18.4%; 95% CI, 16.0% to 21.3%). In the subset of women who tested negative for deleterious mutations in BRCA1/2, ATM, CHEK2*1100delC, and PALB2, estimates were unchanged. Adjustment for known breast cancer single-nucleotide polymorphisms did not affect estimates. Conclusion Breast cancer family history confers a high CBC risk, even after excluding women with deleterious mutations. Clinicians are urged to use detailed family histories to guide treatment and future screening decisions for young women with breast cancer.

PMID: 29620998 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Comparative Molecular Analysis of Gastrointestinal Adenocarcinomas.

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Comparative Molecular Analysis of Gastrointestinal Adenocarcinomas.

Cancer Cell. 2018 Apr 02;:

Authors: Liu Y, Sethi NS, Hinoue T, Schneider BG, Cherniack AD, Sanchez-Vega F, Seoane JA, Farshidfar F, Bowlby R, Islam M, Kim J, Chatila W, Akbani R, Kanchi RS, Rabkin CS, Willis JE, Wang KK, McCall SJ, Mishra L, Ojesina AI, Bullman S, Pedamallu CS, Lazar AJ, Sakai R, Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network, Thorsson V, Bass AJ, Laird PW

Abstract
We analyzed 921 adenocarcinomas of the esophagus, stomach, colon, and rectum to examine shared and distinguishing molecular characteristics of gastrointestinal tract adenocarcinomas (GIACs). Hypermutated tumors were distinct regardless of cancer type and comprised those enriched for insertions/deletions, representing microsatellite instability cases with epigenetic silencing of MLH1 in the context of CpG island methylator phenotype, plus tumors with elevated single-nucleotide variants associated with mutations in POLE. Tumors with chromosomal instability were diverse, with gastroesophageal adenocarcinomas harboring fragmented genomes associated with genomic doubling and distinct mutational signatures. We identified a group of tumors in the colon and rectum lacking hypermutation and aneuploidy termed genome stable and enriched in DNA hypermethylation and mutations in KRAS, SOX9, and PCBP1.

PMID: 29622466 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Plain-language medical vocabulary for precision diagnosis.

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Plain-language medical vocabulary for precision diagnosis.

Nat Genet. 2018 Apr;50(4):474-476

Authors: Vasilevsky NA, Foster ED, Engelstad ME, Carmody L, Might M, Chambers C, Dawkins HJS, Lewis J, Della Rocca MG, Snyder M, Boerkoel CF, Rath A, Terry SF, Kent A, Searle B, Baynam G, Jones E, Gavin P, Bamshad M, Chong J, Groza T, Adams D, Resnick AC, Heath AP, Mungall C, Holm IA, Rageth K, Brownstein CA, Shefchek K, McMurry JA, Robinson PN, Köhler S, Haendel MA

PMID: 29632381 [PubMed - in process]

ARID1A Maintains Differentiation of Pancreatic Ductal Cells and Inhibits Development of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma in Mice.

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ARID1A Maintains Differentiation of Pancreatic Ductal Cells and Inhibits Development of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma in Mice.

Gastroenterology. 2018 Mar 28;:

Authors: Kimura Y, Fukuda A, Ogawa S, Maruno T, Takada Y, Tsuda M, Hiramatsu Y, Araki O, Nagao M, Yoshikawa T, Ikuta K, Yoshioka T, Wang Z, Akiyama H, Wright CV, Takaori K, Uemoto S, Chiba T, Seno H

Abstract
BACKGROUND & AIMS: The AT-rich interaction domain 1A gene (ARID1A) encodes a protein that is part of the large ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex SWI/SNF and is frequently mutated in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs). We investigated the functions of ARID1A during formation of PDACs in mice.
METHODS: We performed studies with Ptf1a-Cre; KrasG12D mice, which express activated Kras in the pancreas and develop pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanINs), as well as those with disruption of Aird1a (Ptf1a-Cre; KrasG12D; Arid1af/f mice) or disruption of Brg1 (encodes a catalytic ATPase of the SWI/SNF complex) (Ptf1a-Cre; KrasG12D; Brg1f/f mice). Pancreatic ductal cells (PDCs) were isolated from Arid1af/f mice and from Arid1af/f; SOX9OE mice, which overexpress human SOX9 upon infection with an adenovirus expressing Cre recombinase. Pancreatic tissues were collected from all mice and analyzed by histology and immunohistochemistry; cells were isolated and grown in 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional cultures. We performed microarray analyses to compare gene expression patterns in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) from the different strains of mice. We obtained 58 samples of IPMN and 44 samples of PDAC from patients who underwent pancreatectomy in Japan, and analyzed them by immunohistochemistry.
RESULTS: Ptf1a-Cre; KrasG12D mice developed PanINs, whereas Ptf1a-Cre; KrasG12D; Arid1af/f mice developed IPMNs and PDACs; IPMNs originated from PDCs. ARID1A-deficient IPMNs did not express SOX9. ARID1A-deficient PDCs had reduced expression of SOX9 and dedifferentiated in culture. Overexpression of SOX9 in these cells allowed them to differentiate and prevented dilation of ducts. Among mice with pancreatic expression of activated Kras, those with disruption of Arid1a developed fewer PDACs from IPMNs than mice with disruption of Brg1. ARID1A-deficient IPMNs had reduced activity of the mTOR pathway. Human IPMN and PDAC specimens had reduced levels of ARID1A, SOX9, and phosphorylated S6 (a marker of mTOR pathway activation). Levels of ARID1A correlated with levels of SOX9 and phosphorylated S6.
CONCLUSIONS: ARID1A regulates expression of SOX9, activation of the mTOR pathway, and differentiation of PDCs. ARID1A inhibits formation of PDACs from IPMNs in mice with pancreatic expression of activated KRAS, and is downregulated in IPMN and PDAC tissues from patients.

PMID: 29604291 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Association of E-Cigarette Use With Smoking Cessation Among Smokers Who Plan to Quit After a Hospitalization: A Prospective Study.

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Association of E-Cigarette Use With Smoking Cessation Among Smokers Who Plan to Quit After a Hospitalization: A Prospective Study.

Ann Intern Med. 2018 Mar 27;:

Authors: Rigotti NA, Chang Y, Tindle HA, Kalkhoran SM, Levy DE, Regan S, Kelley JHK, Davis EM, Singer DE

Abstract
Background: Many smokers report using e-cigarettes to help them quit smoking, but whether e-cigarettes aid cessation efforts is uncertain.
Objective: To determine whether e-cigarette use after hospital discharge is associated with subsequent tobacco abstinence among smokers who plan to quit and are advised to use evidence-based treatment.
Design: Secondary data analysis of a randomized controlled trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01714323 [parent trial]).
Setting: 3 hospitals.
Participants: 1357 hospitalized adult cigarette smokers who planned to stop smoking, received tobacco cessation counseling in the hospital, and were randomly assigned at discharge to a tobacco treatment recommendation (control) or free tobacco treatment (intervention).
Measurements: Self-reported e-cigarette use (exposure) was assessed 1 and 3 months after discharge; biochemically validated tobacco abstinence (outcome) was assessed 6 months after discharge.
Results: Twenty-eight percent of participants used an e-cigarette within 3 months after discharge. In an analysis of 237 propensity score-matched pairs, e-cigarette users were less likely than nonusers to abstain from tobacco use at 6 months (10.1% vs. 26.6%; risk difference, -16.5% [95% CI, -23.3% to -9.6%]). The association between e-cigarette use and quitting varied between intervention patients, who were given easy access to conventional treatment (7.7% vs. 29.8%; risk difference, -22.1% [CI, -32.3% to -11.9%]), and control patients, who received only treatment recommendations (12.0% vs. 24.1%; risk difference, -12.0% [CI, -21.2% to 2.9%]) (P for interaction = 0.143).
Limitations: Patients self-selected e-cigarette use. Unmeasured confounding is possible in an observational study.
Conclusion: During 3 months after hospital discharge, more than a quarter of smokers attempting to quit used e-cigarettes, mostly to aid cessation, but few used them regularly. This pattern of use was associated with less tobacco abstinence at 6 months than among smokers who did not use e-cigarettes. Additional study is needed to determine whether regular use of e-cigarettes aids or hinders smoking cessation.
Primary Funding Source: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

PMID: 29582077 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Five-Year Follow-Up of Nivolumab in Previously Treated Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Results From the CA209-003 Study.

Five-Year Follow-Up of Nivolumab in Previously Treated Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Results From the CA209-003 Study.

J Clin Oncol. 2018 Mar 23;:JCO2017770412

Authors: Gettinger S, Horn L, Jackman D, Spigel D, Antonia S, Hellmann M, Powderly J, Heist R, Sequist LV, Smith DC, Leming P, Geese WJ, Yoon D, Li A, Brahmer J

Abstract
Purpose In two phase III studies, nivolumab, a programmed death-1 (PD-1) inhibitor antibody, improved overall survival (OS) versus docetaxel in pretreated advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We report 5-year follow-up results from an early phase I study of nivolumab in this patient population and describe characteristics of 5-year survivors. Patients and Methods Patients with pretreated, advanced NSCLC received nivolumab 1, 3, or 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks in 8-week cycles for up to 96 weeks. OS from the time of first dose was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results The estimated 5-year OS rate was 16% for all treated patients (N = 129); 5-year OS rates were similar for squamous (16%) and nonsquamous (15%) NSCLC. Of 16 5-year survivors, most (88%) were known current or former smokers. Of 10 5-year survivors with quantifiable PD-1 ligand 1 expression, 70% had ≥ 1% PD-1 ligand 1 expression at baseline. Twelve 5-year survivors (75%) achieved a partial response to nivolumab per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, version 1.0, and two each (12%) had stable disease and progressive disease as best response. Nine 5-year survivors (56%) completed the maximum 96 weeks of nivolumab; four (25%) discontinued owing to adverse events and three (19%) owing to disease progression. As of a November 2016 database lock, 12 5-year survivors (75%) received no subsequent therapy and were without evidence of progressive disease at last follow-up. Conclusions Nivolumab treatment resulted in long-term OS and durable responses in a proportion of patients with pretreated advanced NSCLC. Long-term survivors had diverse baseline and on-treatment characteristics.

PMID: 29570421 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Genetic Risk Score is Associated With Prevalence of Advanced Neoplasms in a Colorectal Cancer Screening Population.

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Genetic Risk Score is Associated With Prevalence of Advanced Neoplasms in a Colorectal Cancer Screening Population.

Gastroenterology. 2018 Mar 21;:

Authors: Weigl K, Thomsen H, Balavarca Y, Hellwege JN, Shrubsole MJ, Brenner H

Abstract
BACKGROUND & AIMS: The presence of specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) can be used to calculate an individual's risk for colorectal cancer (CRC), called a genetic risk score (GRS). We investigated whether GRS can identify individuals with clinically relevant neoplasms in a screening colonoscopy population.
METHODS: We derived a GRS based on 48 SNPs associated with CRC, identified in a comprehensive literature search. We obtained genetic data from 1043 participants (50-79 years old) in a screening colonoscopy study in Germany, recruited from 2005 through 2013 (294 with advanced neoplasms, 249 with non-advanced adenomas, and 500 without neoplasms). Each participant was assigned a GRS by aggregating their risk alleles (0, 1, or 2). Risk of advanced neoplasms and non-advanced adenoma according to GRS was calculated by multiple logistic regression. Risk advancement periods were calculated. We replicated our findings using data from a subset of the Tennessee Colorectal Polyp Study.
RESULTS: An increased GRS was associated with higher prevalence of advanced neoplasms, but not non-advanced adenomas. Participants in the middle and upper tertile of GRSs had a 2.2-fold and 2.7-fold increase in risk, respectively, of advanced neoplasms compared to those in the lower tertile. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were 1.09 (95% CI, 0.76-1.57) for non-advanced adenoma in the middle tertile and 1.05 (95% CI, 0.70-1.55) for non-advanced adenoma in the upper tertile. The ORs were largest for proximal advanced neoplasms for participants in the middle tertile (OR, 3.55; 95% CI 1.85-6.82) and the upper tertile (OR, 3.61; 95% CI 1.84-7.10). The risk advancement period for medium vs low GRS was 13.4 years (95% CI 4.8-22.0) and for high vs low GRS was 17.5 years (95% CI, 7.8-27.3).
CONCLUSIONS: In a genetic analysis of participants in a CRC screening study in Germany, an increased GRS (based on CRC-associated SNPs) was associated with increased prevalence of advanced neoplasms. These findings might be used in defining risk-adapted screening ages.

PMID: 29574091 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Phenotype risk scores identify patients with unrecognized Mendelian disease patterns.

Phenotype risk scores identify patients with unrecognized Mendelian disease patterns.

Science. 2018 Mar 16;359(6381):1233-1239

Authors: Bastarache L, Hughey JJ, Hebbring S, Marlo J, Zhao W, Ho WT, Van Driest SL, McGregor TL, Mosley JD, Wells QS, Temple M, Ramirez AH, Carroll R, Osterman T, Edwards T, Ruderfer D, Velez Edwards DR, Hamid R, Cogan J, Glazer A, Wei WQ, Feng Q, Brilliant M, Zhao ZJ, Cox NJ, Roden DM, Denny JC

Abstract
Genetic association studies often examine features independently, potentially missing subpopulations with multiple phenotypes that share a single cause. We describe an approach that aggregates phenotypes on the basis of patterns described by Mendelian diseases. We mapped the clinical features of 1204 Mendelian diseases into phenotypes captured from the electronic health record (EHR) and summarized this evidence as phenotype risk scores (PheRSs). In an initial validation, PheRS distinguished cases and controls of five Mendelian diseases. Applying PheRS to 21,701 genotyped individuals uncovered 18 associations between rare variants and phenotypes consistent with Mendelian diseases. In 16 patients, the rare genetic variants were associated with severe outcomes such as organ transplants. PheRS can augment rare-variant interpretation and may identify subsets of patients with distinct genetic causes for common diseases.

PMID: 29590070 [PubMed - in process]

Publisher Correction: Protein-altering variants associated with body mass index implicate pathways that control energy intake and expenditure in obesity.

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Publisher Correction: Protein-altering variants associated with body mass index implicate pathways that control energy intake and expenditure in obesity.

Nat Genet. 2018 Mar 16;:

Authors: Turcot V, Lu Y, Highland HM, Schurmann C, Justice AE, Fine RS, Bradfield JP, Esko T, Giri A, Graff M, Guo X, Hendricks AE, Karaderi T, Lempradl A, Locke AE, Mahajan A, Marouli E, Sivapalaratnam S, Young KL, Alfred T, Feitosa MF, Masca NGD, Manning AK, Medina-Gomez C, Mudgal P, Ng MCY, Reiner AP, Vedantam S, Willems SM, Winkler TW, Abecasis G, Aben KK, Alam DS, Alharthi SE, Allison M, Amouyel P, Asselbergs FW, Auer PL, Balkau B, Bang LE, Barroso I, Bastarache L, Benn M, Bergmann S, Bielak LF, Blüher M, Boehnke M, Boeing H, Boerwinkle E, Böger CA, Bork-Jensen J, Bots ML, Bottinger EP, Bowden DW, Brandslund I, Breen G, Brilliant MH, Broer L, Brumat M, Burt AA, Butterworth AS, Campbell PT, Cappellani S, Carey DJ, Catamo E, Caulfield MJ, Chambers JC, Chasman DI, Chen YI, Chowdhury R, Christensen C, Chu AY, Cocca M, Collins FS, Cook JP, Corley J, Corominas Galbany J, Cox AJ, Crosslin DS, Cuellar-Partida G, D'Eustacchio A, Danesh J, Davies G, Bakker PIW, Groot MCH, Mutsert R, Deary IJ, Dedoussis G, Demerath EW, Heijer M, Hollander AI, Ruijter HM, Dennis JG, Denny JC, Di Angelantonio E, Drenos F, Du M, Dubé MP, Dunning AM, Easton DF, Edwards TL, Ellinghaus D, Ellinor PT, Elliott P, Evangelou E, Farmaki AE, Farooqi IS, Faul JD, Fauser S, Feng S, Ferrannini E, Ferrieres J, Florez JC, Ford I, Fornage M, Franco OH, Franke A, Franks PW, Friedrich N, Frikke-Schmidt R, Galesloot TE, Gan W, Gandin I, Gasparini P, Gibson J, Giedraitis V, Gjesing AP, Gordon-Larsen P, Gorski M, Grabe HJ, Grant SFA, Grarup N, Griffiths HL, Grove ML, Gudnason V, Gustafsson S, Haessler J, Hakonarson H, Hammerschlag AR, Hansen T, Harris KM, Harris TB, Hattersley AT, Have CT, Hayward C, He L, Heard-Costa NL, Heath AC, Heid IM, Helgeland Ø, Hernesniemi J, Hewitt AW, Holmen OL, Hovingh GK, Howson JMM, Hu Y, Huang PL, Huffman JE, Ikram MA, Ingelsson E, Jackson AU, Jansson JH, Jarvik GP, Jensen GB, Jia Y, Johansson S, Jørgensen ME, Jørgensen T, Jukema JW, Kahali B, Kahn RS, Kähönen M, Kamstrup PR, Kanoni S, Kaprio J, Karaleftheri M, Kardia SLR, Karpe F, Kathiresan S, Kee F, Kiemeney LA, Kim E, Kitajima H, Komulainen P, Kooner JS, Kooperberg C, Korhonen T, Kovacs P, Kuivaniemi H, Kutalik Z, Kuulasmaa K, Kuusisto J, Laakso M, Lakka TA, Lamparter D, Lange EM, Lange LA, Langenberg C, Larson EB, Lee NR, Lehtimäki T, Lewis CE, Li H, Li J, Li-Gao R, Lin H, Lin KH, Lin LA, Lin X, Lind L, Lindström J, Linneberg A, Liu CT, Liu DJ, Liu Y, Lo KS, Lophatananon A, Lotery AJ, Loukola A, Luan J, Lubitz SA, Lyytikäinen LP, Männistö S, Marenne G, Mazul AL, McCarthy MI, McKean-Cowdin R, Medland SE, Meidtner K, Milani L, Mistry V, Mitchell P, Mohlke KL, Moilanen L, Moitry M, Montgomery GW, Mook-Kanamori DO, Moore C, Mori TA, Morris AD, Morris AP, Müller-Nurasyid M, Munroe PB, Nalls MA, Narisu N, Nelson CP, Neville M, Nielsen SF, Nikus K, Njølstad PR, Nordestgaard BG, Nyholt DR, O'Connel JR, O'Donoghue ML, Olde Loohuis LM, Ophoff RA, Owen KR, Packard CJ, Padmanabhan S, Palmer CNA, Palmer ND, Pasterkamp G, Patel AP, Pattie A, Pedersen O, Peissig PL, Peloso GM, Pennell CE, Perola M, Perry JA, Perry JRB, Pers TH, Person TN, Peters A, Petersen ERB, Peyser PA, Pirie A, Polasek O, Polderman TJ, Puolijoki H, Raitakari OT, Rasheed A, Rauramaa R, Reilly DF, Renström F, Rheinberger M, Ridker PM, Rioux JD, Rivas MA, Roberts DJ, Robertson NR, Robino A, Rolandsson O, Rudan I, Ruth KS, Saleheen D, Salomaa V, Samani NJ, Sapkota Y, Sattar N, Schoen RE, Schreiner PJ, Schulze MB, Scott RA, Segura-Lepe MP, Shah SH, Sheu WH, Sim X, Slater AJ, Small KS, Smith AV, Southam L, Spector TD, Speliotes EK, Starr JM, Stefansson K, Steinthorsdottir V, Stirrups KE, Strauch K, Stringham HM, Stumvoll M, Sun L, Surendran P, Swift AJ, Tada H, Tansey KE, Tardif JC, Taylor KD, Teumer A, Thompson DJ, Thorleifsson G, Thorsteinsdottir U, Thuesen BH, Tönjes A, Tromp G, Trompet S, Tsafantakis E, Tuomilehto J, Tybjaerg-Hansen A, Tyrer JP, Uher R, Uitterlinden AG, Uusitupa M, Laan SW, Duijn CM, Leeuwen N, van Setten J, Vanhala M, Varbo A, Varga TV, Varma R, Velez Edwards DR, Vermeulen SH, Veronesi G, Vestergaard H, Vitart V, Vogt TF, Völker U, Vuckovic D, Wagenknecht LE, Walker M, Wallentin L, Wang F, Wang CA, Wang S, Wang Y, Ware EB, Wareham NJ, Warren HR, Waterworth DM, Wessel J, White HD, Willer CJ, Wilson JG, Witte DR, Wood AR, Wu Y, Yaghootkar H, Yao J, Yao P, Yerges-Armstrong LM, Young R, Zeggini E, Zhan X, Zhang W, Zhao JH, Zhao W, Zhao W, Zhou W, Zondervan KT, Rotter JI, Pospisilik JA, Rivadeneira F, Borecki IB, Deloukas P, Frayling TM, Lettre G, North KE, Lindgren CM, Hirschhorn JN, Loos RJF, CHD Exome+ Consortium, EPIC-CVD Consortium, ExomeBP Consortium, Global Lipids Genetic Consortium, GoT2D Genes Consortium, EPIC InterAct Consortium, INTERVAL Study, ReproGen Consortium, T2D-Genes Consortium, MAGIC Investigators, Understanding Society Scientific Group

Abstract
In the version of this article originally published, one of the two authors with the name Wei Zhao was omitted from the author list and the affiliations for both authors were assigned to the single Wei Zhao in the author list. In addition, the ORCID for Wei Zhao (Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA) was incorrectly assigned to author Wei Zhou. The errors have been corrected in the HTML and PDF versions of the article.

PMID: 29549330 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Publisher Correction: Protein-altering variants associated with body mass index implicate pathways that control energy intake and expenditure in obesity.

Related Articles

Publisher Correction: Protein-altering variants associated with body mass index implicate pathways that control energy intake and expenditure in obesity.

Nat Genet. 2018 Mar 16;:

Authors: Turcot V, Lu Y, Highland HM, Schurmann C, Justice AE, Fine RS, Bradfield JP, Esko T, Giri A, Graff M, Guo X, Hendricks AE, Karaderi T, Lempradl A, Locke AE, Mahajan A, Marouli E, Sivapalaratnam S, Young KL, Alfred T, Feitosa MF, Masca NGD, Manning AK, Medina-Gomez C, Mudgal P, Ng MCY, Reiner AP, Vedantam S, Willems SM, Winkler TW, Abecasis G, Aben KK, Alam DS, Alharthi SE, Allison M, Amouyel P, Asselbergs FW, Auer PL, Balkau B, Bang LE, Barroso I, Bastarache L, Benn M, Bergmann S, Bielak LF, Blüher M, Boehnke M, Boeing H, Boerwinkle E, Böger CA, Bork-Jensen J, Bots ML, Bottinger EP, Bowden DW, Brandslund I, Breen G, Brilliant MH, Broer L, Brumat M, Burt AA, Butterworth AS, Campbell PT, Cappellani S, Carey DJ, Catamo E, Caulfield MJ, Chambers JC, Chasman DI, Chen YI, Chowdhury R, Christensen C, Chu AY, Cocca M, Collins FS, Cook JP, Corley J, Corominas Galbany J, Cox AJ, Crosslin DS, Cuellar-Partida G, D'Eustacchio A, Danesh J, Davies G, Bakker PIW, Groot MCH, Mutsert R, Deary IJ, Dedoussis G, Demerath EW, Heijer M, Hollander AI, Ruijter HM, Dennis JG, Denny JC, Angelantonio E, Drenos F, Du M, Dubé MP, Dunning AM, Easton DF, Edwards TL, Ellinghaus D, Ellinor PT, Elliott P, Evangelou E, Farmaki AE, Farooqi IS, Faul JD, Fauser S, Feng S, Ferrannini E, Ferrieres J, Florez JC, Ford I, Fornage M, Franco OH, Franke A, Franks PW, Friedrich N, Frikke-Schmidt R, Galesloot TE, Gan W, Gandin I, Gasparini P, Gibson J, Giedraitis V, Gjesing AP, Gordon-Larsen P, Gorski M, Grabe HJ, Grant SFA, Grarup N, Griffiths HL, Grove ML, Gudnason V, Gustafsson S, Haessler J, Hakonarson H, Hammerschlag AR, Hansen T, Harris KM, Harris TB, Hattersley AT, Have CT, Hayward C, He L, Heard-Costa NL, Heath AC, Heid IM, Helgeland Ø, Hernesniemi J, Hewitt AW, Holmen OL, Hovingh GK, Howson JMM, Hu Y, Huang PL, Huffman JE, Ikram MA, Ingelsson E, Jackson AU, Jansson JH, Jarvik GP, Jensen GB, Jia Y, Johansson S, Jørgensen ME, Jørgensen T, Jukema JW, Kahali B, Kahn RS, Kähönen M, Kamstrup PR, Kanoni S, Kaprio J, Karaleftheri M, Kardia SLR, Karpe F, Kathiresan S, Kee F, Kiemeney LA, Kim E, Kitajima H, Komulainen P, Kooner JS, Kooperberg C, Korhonen T, Kovacs P, Kuivaniemi H, Kutalik Z, Kuulasmaa K, Kuusisto J, Laakso M, Lakka TA, Lamparter D, Lange EM, Lange LA, Langenberg C, Larson EB, Lee NR, Lehtimäki T, Lewis CE, Li H, Li J, Li-Gao R, Lin H, Lin KH, Lin LA, Lin X, Lind L, Lindström J, Linneberg A, Liu CT, Liu DJ, Liu Y, Lo KS, Lophatananon A, Lotery AJ, Loukola A, Luan J, Lubitz SA, Lyytikäinen LP, Männistö S, Marenne G, Mazul AL, McCarthy MI, McKean-Cowdin R, Medland SE, Meidtner K, Milani L, Mistry V, Mitchell P, Mohlke KL, Moilanen L, Moitry M, Montgomery GW, Mook-Kanamori DO, Moore C, Mori TA, Morris AD, Morris AP, Müller-Nurasyid M, Munroe PB, Nalls MA, Narisu N, Nelson CP, Neville M, Nielsen SF, Nikus K, Njølstad PR, Nordestgaard BG, Nyholt DR, O'Connel JR, O'Donoghue ML, Olde Loohuis LM, Ophoff RA, Owen KR, Packard CJ, Padmanabhan S, Palmer CNA, Palmer ND, Pasterkamp G, Patel AP, Pattie A, Pedersen O, Peissig PL, Peloso GM, Pennell CE, Perola M, Perry JA, Perry JRB, Pers TH, Person TN, Peters A, Petersen ERB, Peyser PA, Pirie A, Polasek O, Polderman TJ, Puolijoki H, Raitakari OT, Rasheed A, Rauramaa R, Reilly DF, Renström F, Rheinberger M, Ridker PM, Rioux JD, Rivas MA, Roberts DJ, Robertson NR, Robino A, Rolandsson O, Rudan I, Ruth KS, Saleheen D, Salomaa V, Samani NJ, Sapkota Y, Sattar N, Schoen RE, Schreiner PJ, Schulze MB, Scott RA, Segura-Lepe MP, Shah SH, Sheu WH, Sim X, Slater AJ, Small KS, Smith AV, Southam L, Spector TD, Speliotes EK, Starr JM, Stefansson K, Steinthorsdottir V, Stirrups KE, Strauch K, Stringham HM, Stumvoll M, Sun L, Surendran P, Swift AJ, Tada H, Tansey KE, Tardif JC, Taylor KD, Teumer A, Thompson DJ, Thorleifsson G, Thorsteinsdottir U, Thuesen BH, Tönjes A, Tromp G, Trompet S, Tsafantakis E, Tuomilehto J, Tybjaerg-Hansen A, Tyrer JP, Uher R, Uitterlinden AG, Uusitupa M, Laan SW, Duijn CM, Leeuwen N, van Setten J, Vanhala M, Varbo A, Varga TV, Varma R, Velez Edwards DR, Vermeulen SH, Veronesi G, Vestergaard H, Vitart V, Vogt TF, Völker U, Vuckovic D, Wagenknecht LE, Walker M, Wallentin L, Wang F, Wang CA, Wang S, Wang Y, Ware EB, Wareham NJ, Warren HR, Waterworth DM, Wessel J, White HD, Willer CJ, Wilson JG, Witte DR, Wood AR, Wu Y, Yaghootkar H, Yao J, Yao P, Yerges-Armstrong LM, Young R, Zeggini E, Zhan X, Zhang W, Zhao JH, Zhao W, Zhou W, Zondervan KT, Rotter JI, Pospisilik JA, Rivadeneira F, Borecki IB, Deloukas P, Frayling TM, Lettre G, North KE, Lindgren CM, Hirschhorn JN, Loos RJF, CHD Exome+ Consortium, EPIC-CVD Consortium, ExomeBP Consortium, Global Lipids Genetic Consortium, GoT2D Genes Consortium, EPIC InterAct Consortium, INTERVAL Study, ReproGen Consortium, T2D-Genes Consortium, MAGIC Investigators, Understanding Society Scientific Group

Abstract
In the published version of this paper, the name of author Emanuele Di Angelantonio was misspelled. This error has now been corrected in the HTML and PDF versions of the article.

PMID: 29549329 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Myocarditis in Patients Treated With Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors.

Myocarditis in Patients Treated With Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors.

J Am Coll Cardiol. 2018 Mar 13;:

Authors: Mahmood SS, Fradley MG, Cohen JV, Nohria A, Reynolds KL, Heinzerling LM, Sullivan RJ, Damrongwatanasuk R, Chen CL, Gupta D, Kirchberger MC, Awadalla M, Hassan MZO, Moslehi JJ, Shah SP, Ganatra S, Thavendiranathan P, Lawrence DP, Groarke JD, Neilan TG

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Myocarditis is an uncommon, but potentially fatal, toxicity of immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI). Myocarditis after ICI has not been well characterized.
OBJECTIVES: The authors sought to understand the presentation and clinical course of ICI-associated myocarditis.
METHODS: After observation of sporadic ICI-associated myocarditis cases, the authors created a multicenter registry with 8 sites. From November 2013 to July 2017, there were 35 patients with ICI-associated myocarditis, who were compared to a random sample of 105 ICI-treated patients without myocarditis. Covariates of interest were extracted from medical records including the occurrence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE), defined as the composite of cardiovascular death, cardiogenic shock, cardiac arrest, and hemodynamically significant complete heart block.
RESULTS: The prevalence of myocarditis was 1.14% with a median time of onset of 34 days after starting ICI (interquartile range 21 to 75). Cases were 65 ± 13 years of age, 29% were female, and 54% had no other immune-related side effects. Relative to controls, combination ICI (34% vs. 2%; p < 0.001) and diabetes (34% vs. 13%; p = 0.01) were more common in cases. Over 102 days (interquartile range 62 to 214) of median follow-up, 16 (46%) developed MACE; 38% of MACE occurred with normal ejection fraction. There was a 4-fold increased risk of MACE with troponin T of ≥1.5 ng/ml (hazard ratio 4.0; 95% confidence interval 1.5 to 10.9; p = 0.003). Steroids were administered in 89%, and lower steroids doses were associated with higher residual troponin and higher MACE rates.
CONCLUSIONS: Myocarditis after ICI therapy may be more common than appreciated, occurs early after starting treatment, has a malignant course, and responds to higher steroid doses.

PMID: 29567210 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Association of HIV Infection and Risk of Peripheral Artery Disease.

Related Articles

Association of HIV Infection and Risk of Peripheral Artery Disease.

Circulation. 2018 Mar 13;:

Authors: Beckman JA, Duncan MS, Alcorn CW, So-Armah K, Butt AA, Goetz MB, Tindle HA, Sico J, Tracy RP, Justice AC, Freiberg MS

Abstract
Background -The effect of HIV on the development of peripheral artery disease (PAD) remains unclear. We investigated whether HIV infection is associated with an increased risk of PAD after adjustment for traditional atherosclerotic risk factors in a large cohort of HIV infected (HIV+) and demographically similar HIV uninfected veterans. Methods -We studied participants in the Veterans Aging Cohort Study from April 1, 2003 through December 31, 2014. We excluded participants with known prior PAD or prevalent cardiovascular disease (myocardial infarction, stroke, coronary heart disease, and congestive heart failure) and analyzed the effect of HIV status on the risk of incident PAD events after adjusting for demographics, PAD risk factors, substance use, CD4 cell count, HIV-1 RNA, and antiretroviral therapy. The primary outcome is incident peripheral artery disease events. Secondary outcomes include mortality and amputation in subjects with incident PAD events by HIV infection status, viral load, and CD4 count. Results -Among 91,953 participants, over a median follow up of 9.0 years, there were 7708 incident PAD events. Rates of incident PAD events per 1000 person-years were higher among HIV+ (11.9, 95% confidence interval (CI)=11.5-12.4) than uninfected veterans (9.9, 95% CI=9.6-10.1). After adjustment for demographics, PAD risk factors, and other covariates, HIV+ veterans had an increased risk of incident PAD events compared to uninfected veterans hazard ratio (HR)=1.19 [95% (CI)=1.13-1.25]. This risk was highest among those with time-updated HIV viral load>500 copies/ml (HR=1.51, 95% CI=1.38-1.65) and CD4 cell counts<200 cells/mm3 (HR=1.91, 95% CI=1.71-2.13). In contrast, HIV+ veterans with time updated CD4 cell count≥500 cells/mm3 had no increased risk of PAD (HR=1.03, 95% CI=0.96-1.11). Mortality rates after incident PAD events are high regardless of HIV status. HIV infection did not affect Rates of amputation after incident PAD events. Conclusions -Infection with HIV is associated with a 19% increased risk of PAD beyond that explained by traditional atherosclerotic risk factors. However, for those with sustained CD4 cell counts<200 cells/mm3 the risk of incident PAD events is nearly two-fold higher whereas for those with sustained CD4 cell counts≥500 cells/mm3 there is no excess risk of incident PAD events compared to uninfected people.

PMID: 29535090 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Hospital Readmission After Perioperative Acute Myocardial Infarction Associated With Noncardiac Surgery.

Related Articles

Hospital Readmission After Perioperative Acute Myocardial Infarction Associated With Noncardiac Surgery.

Circulation. 2018 Mar 10;:

Authors: Smilowitz NR, Beckman JA, Sherman SE, Berger JS

Abstract
BACKGROUND : Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a major cardiovascular complication of noncardiac surgery. We aimed to evaluate the frequency, causes, and outcomes of 30-day hospital readmission after perioperative AMI. METHODS : Patients who were diagnosed with AMI during hospitalization for major noncardiac surgery were identified using the 2014 US Nationwide Readmission Database. Rates, causes, and costs of 30-day readmissions after noncardiac surgery with and without perioperative AMI were identified. RESULTS : Among 3 807 357 hospitalizations for major noncardiac surgery, 8085 patients with perioperative AMI were identified. A total of 1135 patients (14.0%) with perioperative AMI died in-hospital during the index admission. Survivors of perioperative AMI were more likely to be readmitted within 30 days than surgical patients without perioperative AMI (19.1% versus 6.5%, P<0.001). The most common indications for 30-day rehospitalization were management of infectious complications (30.0%), cardiovascular complications (25.3%), and bleeding (10.4%). In-hospital mortality during hospital readmission in the first 30 days after perioperative AMI was 11.3%. At 6 months, the risk of death was 17.6% and ≥1 hospital readmission was 36.2%. CONCLUSIONS : Among patients undergoing noncardiac surgery who develop a perioperative MI, ≈1 in 3 suffer from in-hospital death or hospital readmission in the first 30 days after discharge. Strategies to improve outcomes of surgical patients early after perioperative AMI are warranted.

PMID: 29525764 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]